Cruise control in wet weather?

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BenzBoy

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Recently I was advised that one should never use cruise control in wet weather as the loss of drive to one wheel, or both, may lead to a skid as the car does not react as it would if the driver took his foot off the accelorator...
Obviously, this is now controlled by ESP but would it apply to pre-ESP cars?
I also did a google search and found that there has been an internet myth running for a number of years on this point. However, it was an engineer gave me this advice and he believes it to be true.
I'm sceptical...
Your thoughts on the matter?
Regards,
Brian
 

Tony66_au

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I've used CC in the wet for years on various cars and ive never had an issue nor heard of this.

I would suggest that the CC be set to the conditions and it it gets slippery you disengage but id suggest its a myth.
 

260ebenz

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Relating to this topic of cruise control.

As my Mercedes has c/control can someone please explain to me as I do not know how to use the c/control in my 260E how do I turn on and turn off the c/control?

Many thanks,
Tim.
 

Styria

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Hi BenzBoy and Tony, I have never had a really good cruise control set-up on Gleaming Beauty. It was obviously poorly adjusted, because it would continually 'surge' and throttle back, causing discomfort to passengers and creating doubts in my mind as whether I really wanted to drive under road (speed maintenance) behaviour like that.

Personally, I would never use cruise control in the wet, even though the mere touch of the brake pedal will disengage the unit. I tend to think I have better driving control operating the car in a conventional manner. Just what I think. Regards Styria
 

Oversize

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This has been a myth for many years. Just because the tyres have begun to aquaplane, doesn't mean they'll slow down, or stop turning (which would then trigger the cruise to accelerate). Unfortunately it seems people can no longer think for themselves & have to be told what they should (or should not), do. Has anyone else heard the one about the guy that successfully sued a car manufacturer due to the fact that when he set the cruise on his motorhome & went into the back to make a cuppa, it mysteriously ran off the road?? Apparently they failed to advise him that cruise only operated the accelerator & not the steering!!!! If it's true & not yet another myth, you've gotta wonder how some people reached adulthood....

Back to the operation of the cruise control, MB usually has a stalk on the steering column that controls all the necessary functions. Push the stalk up engages cruise at the current speed (I'm guessing anything above above 60kmh). Push it up again & it should increase the speed slightly. Push & hold it up & the speed will increase until the stalk is released. Pushing the lever down has the opposite effect. Pushing the stalk towards the dashboard should disengage the cruise & allow the vehicle to coast to a stop if the accelerator is not manually depressed. Pulling the stalk toward you (the driver) should resume the speed that was last set; mystery solved! I usually disengage the cruise via the stalk, as its a far smoother transition from power to coast than applying the brakes.

Many early MBs suffer from ineffective cruise & apparently it was a problem with dry soldered joints in the control units. From what I understand the control cables are NLA separately. The later W126 units were more reliable. Does anyone know if they could be adapted to a W116?? :rolleyes:
 
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Tony66_au

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Aftermarket cruise controllers are fairly good to use and Ive had 2 fitted in the past, one to replace an ailing Jag factory unit in a V12 SII and one in an NF SII Fairlane that for some reason came without one.

The Jag and I did a lot of miles often in pouring rain and on the old Hume and I never had an issue with the car getting squirrelly and the Ford was a VHA car (Plain clothes cab) and I did nothing but western vic trips in it in all weather also with no real concerns.

BUT.. Common sense applies and on mornings with black ice she stayed in my capable hands as with extremely heavy downpours.

The Jag however was unphased by the wet and id cruise along at 105 k quite happily.
 

Oversize

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Fortunately I've never had a vehicle aquaplane from under me. I wouldn't use cruise it's been raining heavily; especially if it's not draining away & there's noticeable pools of water on the road. Although you may not see these pools of water (especially at night), you'll be able feel them as a sudden & momentary significant resistance to your progress & the steering may even pull to one side or the other. Oh & it's probably not a good time to take one hand off the steering wheel to change a CD, radio station, play with your GPS, or take another bite of that hamburger!! :eek:
 

450SE

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Many early MBs suffer from ineffective cruise & apparently it was a problem with dry soldered joints in the control units. From what I understand the control cables are NLA separately. The later W126 units were more reliable. Does anyone know if they could be adapted to a W116?? :rolleyes:

My understanding is that from W126 onwards, a sensor - not dissimilar to a spirit level was - fitted alongside the transmission to register the incline or decline of the road. The rate of acceleration was determined based on that information.

But I may be wrong.
 

Tony66_au

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That would be an inclinometer, basically a mercury tilt switch based on your description but it would have to be modified or it would trip on acell/decel.

Personally id be fitting an aftermarket unit from a reputable brand as this technology has advanced well beyond what was available in the 70's.
 

Styria

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Mark, as far as your query concerning interchangeability between Ch. 126 and Ch. 116 is concerned, it is my understanding that the 126 control unit has a higher/lower (take your pick) number of pins. Thus I would say they're not interchangeable. Your description of the operation of the cruise control lever is spot on.

I don't particularly fancy cruise control, or using it, but it'd be nice to have a working unit - after all, that's what the manufacturer fitted on the assembly line. Regards Styria
 

Oversize

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Nothing beats cruise on a long trip! It's obviously not suitable when you want a fun, spirited drive.....
 

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