Anti Lock Brakes

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sean sherry

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I know they are only as good as the Tires on the Car especially the Fronts.
But does the system have a life cycle ? Can it be tested as it ages ? If the dash warning light goes out on start up is that a guarantee that all is well ?.
Should we do a " Rattle Test " now and then, to trigger it ? Does a Brake Fluid change flush out the Anti Lock system as well ? :confused:
 

Patrick_R

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Sean,

The acronym ABS comes from its German name Anti Blockier System given to it by Bosch, after many early years of use starting in aircraft.

To answer your questions.

Tyres are of course very important to traction, and dispersing water from under the tyre however an ABS system will still never allow a completely bald tyre from locking up, or skidding

The only life cycle it has, is if the system fails its start up procedure test.
(Then the technician finds out what part of the system has failed)

It tests its self during its start up procedure.
The test incorporates all parts of the system, pressures & all electronics are tested during start up.

Yes, if the start up test is successful, and the light goes out, it will operate.

By all means,
Give it a test any time you want, just make sure you have nothing loose in the car to fly forward.
I always show new drivers, or sales staff when I am training them in any truck exactly how the ABS (and all the other electronic safety systems) work. Most drivers have never experienced these systems in an emergency situation.
It’s good to show them how you can confidently push the brake as hard and fast as you possibly can, and the system will do the rest without the fear of locking a brake, and getting out of control.

Modern systems require flushing periodically, but not as much as the older brake systems due to the fact that most brake fluid now is fully synthetic, and non Hygroscopic, where older systems have a mineral base brake fluid that is Hygroscopic. These are flushed more regularly to ensure there is no water molecules in the system. As brake fluid boils at a very high temperature, where water boils at 100degC at sea level, and if it does boil from high use or a dragging brake etc, it will then introduce steam into the system, which of course as a gas, compared to the liquid brake fluid, can compress, and then you either get no brake pedal, or a spongy pedal.
 
OP
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sean sherry

Connoisseur
Messages
1,689
Points
59
Location
sydney
Sean,

The acronym ABS comes from its German name Anti Blockier System given to it by Bosch, after many early years of use starting in aircraft.

To answer your questions.

Tyres are of course very important to traction, and dispersing water from under the tyre however an ABS system will still never allow a completely bald tyre from locking up, or skidding

The only life cycle it has, is if the system fails its start up procedure test.
(Then the technician finds out what part of the system has failed)

It tests its self during its start up procedure.
The test incorporates all parts of the system, pressures & all electronics are tested during start up.

Yes, if the start up test is successful, and the light goes out, it will operate.

By all means,
Give it a test any time you want, just make sure you have nothing loose in the car to fly forward.
I always show new drivers, or sales staff when I am training them in any truck exactly how the ABS (and all the other electronic safety systems) work. Most drivers have never experienced these systems in an emergency situation.
Sean,

The acronym ABS comes from its German name Anti Blockier System given to it by Bosch, after many early years of use starting in aircraft.

To answer your questions.

Tyres are of course very important to traction, and dispersing water from under the tyre however an ABS system will still never allow a completely bald tyre from locking up, or skidding

The only life cycle it has, is if the system fails its start up procedure test.
(Then the technician finds out what part of the system has failed)

It tests its self during its start up procedure.
The test incorporates all parts of the system, pressures & all electronics are tested during start up.

Yes, if the start up test is successful, and the light goes out, it will operate.

By all means,
Give it a test any time you want, just make sure you have nothing loose in the car to fly forward.
I always show new drivers, or sales staff when I am training them in any truck exactly how the ABS (and all the other electronic safety systems) work. Most drivers have never experienced these systems in an emergency situation.
It’s good to show them how you can confidently push the brake as hard and fast as you possibly can, and the system will do the rest without the fear of locking a brake, and getting out of control.

Modern systems require flushing periodically, but not as much as the older brake systems due to the fact that most brake fluid now is fully synthetic, and non Hygroscopic, where older systems have a mineral base brake fluid that is Hygroscopic. These are flushed more regularly to ensure there is no water molecules in the system. As brake fluid boils at a very high temperature, where water boils at 100degC at sea level, and if it does boil from high use or a dragging brake etc, it will then introduce steam into the system, which of course as a gas, compared to the liquid brake fluid, can compress, and then you either get no brake pedal, or a spongy pedal.


It’s good to show them how you can confidently push the brake as hard and fast as you possibly can, and the system will do the rest without the fear of locking a brake, and getting out of control.
Modern systems require flushing periodically, but not as much as the older brake systems due to the fact that most brake fluid now is fully synthetic, and non Hygroscopic, where older systems have a mineral base brake fluid that is Hygroscopic. These are flushed more regularly to ensure there is no water molecules in the system. As brake fluid boils at a very high temperature, where water boils at 100degC at sea level, and if it does boil from high use or a dragging brake etc, it will then introduce steam into the system, which of course as a gas, compared to the liquid brake fluid, can compress, and then you either get no brake pedal, or a spongy pedal.
 
OP
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sean sherry

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Location
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As always Patrick a detailed explanation. especially the start up testing system .
sean
 
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