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  #61  
Old 11th February 2018, 08:28 AM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Mercedes Fintail vs Rover P5:
https://www.classiccars4sale.net/cla...il-vs-rover-p5

Their verdict:
"While some may value the view of that Three pointed star across the long bonnet there is really no contest here. The Rover is easier to buy, just as easy to service and repair with good parts and specialist back up and if you are looking for a big luxury classic, the Rover is better to drive and far more refined. However, if you can find a nicely maintained rust-free Fintail at a reasonable price, you will certainly have a very rare beast which should cause a lot of interest and hold its value over the years."
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  #62  
Old 11th February 2018, 08:34 AM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Rover P5 vs S-Type Jag

https://www.classiccars4sale.net/cla...uar-s-type-420

It’s amazing how a 1960’s Jaguar that’s demonstrably better to drive and even more luxurious than the Mk2 it is based upon remains the less popular pick? We can’t see it staying that way for much longer so if you are considering an S-type over a Mk2 – the ‘baddies’ choice on the silver screen – steal one while you can at bargain prices. Because these Mk2s with the most are, legal, daylight robbery…

https://drive-my.com/en/test-drive/i...-p5-coupe.html

Both cars finally sweep majestically into the driveway. This has been more than a story of Old Money versus New Money - it’s more a demonstration of how two cars made by manufacturers at the height of their powers can continue to surprise. The S-type combines the best elements of Mk2 and MkX, bringing the ethos of the pre-war sportsman’s transport to the era of the Beatles. It reminds the most jaded of motorists of the joys of driving - and how many other 50-year-old cars would you happily consider using on a long journey?

Meanwhile, for the owner who may not require a sports saloon but still likes to give the chauffeur two guineas to take the night off, the P5 is a gem. It’s not the equal of the Jaguar as a performance car, but as a four-door coupe with understated good looks and standards of comfort and refinement approaching those of a Rolls- Royce Silver Cloud it truly is unique.
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  #63  
Old 11th February 2018, 05:15 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Not a reply to any of the posts, but a link to a Motor Trend feature, both audio and visual, that is quite interesting. Not sure how much navigating you will have to do, but it is worthwhile to pursue a little to get the best out of the feature as presented by Motor Trend. Regards Styria
http://www.motortrend.com/news/12q3-...three-quarters
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  #64  
Old 19th February 2018, 10:28 AM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Interesting P5B Coupe for sale. Looks like driver quality as it has minor rust and a vinyl re-trim. Price is currently $6,600 which is cheaper than flynn cars of similar condition went for.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Rover-P5...-/122970703566
























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Last edited by c107; 28th April 2018 at 05:42 PM.
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  #65  
Old 19th February 2018, 04:02 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

C107, thank you for your work in cataloguing these various tests and comparisons. I have been privileged, or perhaps lucky enough, to have owned the following:

Rover P5 (3.0 litre 6cyl.) 1963 Mark2a Coupe
Rover P5B (3.5 litre 8cyl.) 1972 Saloon
Jaguar 3.8S (6cyl.) 1967 Saloon
Mercedes 220 SEb 1961 Saloon
Mercedes 300 SEL 1966 Saloon

Which was the most exciting ? The Jaguar, without a doubt. I loved the interior red leather seats, the feeling of being surrounded by luxury, the lovely sound of the exhaust system - in short, I would hop into the car many times around midnight just to savour the car and its qualities. It was just all-together except for a) lack of reliability, b) an exhaust system that could not be secured properly on account of round rubber pads that were used to hold the system in place, c) an intermediate gearhold solenoid that refused to work properly and d)in inability to tune the SU Carbies. Mixture rich in town, good on open road. Good mixture in town, too lean on the highway. In the end, it turned out the most unreliable car - perhaps my fault as I still had to learn a bit about mechanics.

Which was the most intriguing ? The 220SE, with four speed manual and a maximum torque at about 4000 rpm. Manage to stay in that band, it went like a scolded cat, not only down hill but also uphill. Even with a trailer, and motor bike on back, it would maintain 60 mph uphill from the Hawkesbury Bridge heading towards Berowra. Drop below 4, and you were done. I even gave a 3.5 V8 a run for its money in the Galston Gorge heading towards Galston. It had beautiful seats (red), especially the backseat, but terrible drum front brakes. They were always binding - probably my fault. It was a real goer.

Best cruising car - without a doubt - the 1963 P5 Coupe with the four speed box and electric overdrive. Wonderful cruising car on the open road with great economy (25mpg), and an ability to just waft along at a leisurely 80mph, in complete safety. You always knew what the car was doing, and what it wanted you to do. I bought this car in 1971, and still have it today being restored. Handling and cornering was a little better than average, but its suspension demonstrated old technology.

Little love was lost on the P5B Saloon. Bouncy front end, horribly weak and inadequate BW35 gearbox, but a great interior. Just gorgeous, and at the time was still young enough for the leather upholstery to be still in really nice condition. Later in life the quality of upholstery left a lot to be desired.

Overall, the best car - probably the 300SEL Saloon. Great suspension, extremely supple featuring Air, self levelling and fantastic family cruiser with a huge boot and comfortable, but not terribly striking, interior. Fairly heavy on fuel even on the open road (19mpg), but very sure footed handler. Suspension wise, in particular, both Mercedes models were somewhat up on the Rovers, with very solid and large wishbones (front) providing wonderful stability. The differential was bolted to the body and, again all round, far more sophisticated than the Rovers, although not that much better in overall handling. The Jaguar, in my opinion, was a bad understeerer, with far too many rubber bushes, and terrible to work on.

I must dig up some photos to illustrate the cars. Regards Styria

Last edited by Styria; 3rd March 2018 at 04:04 PM.
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  #66  
Old 19th February 2018, 04:23 PM
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Smile Re: The Rover P5/P5B

I'm with you there with the 3.8S Jaguar Styria. I had one about 10 years ago, a Manual with O/D. The gear Box was Jaguars own , very big improvement to the Moss Units. I rebuilt the S.U. carbs but could never get the Rear one sorted
Also I could not eliminate the vibration at around the 100/110 Ks, Even with new U Joints and adjusting the Engine up and down etc. I sold it after 6 months and bought the 107 280 SL a very much under rated six cylinder Model. The DOHC engine was probably the best engine Mercedes ever produced.
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  #67  
Old 19th February 2018, 06:48 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean sherry View Post
I'm with you there with the 3.8S Jaguar Styria. I had one about 10 years ago, a Manual with O/D. The gear Box was Jaguars own , very big improvement to the Moss Units.
The Jag manual gearbox is great. I have it in my E-Type 4.2. a 3.8S with a manual+OD is a nice find as many were BW automatic instead. As the S type is a sports sedan the auto doesn't really fit it's character as much as the manual+OD
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  #68  
Old 24th February 2018, 07:18 AM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

A LHD version being restored. Rover never found the success they hoped for in the United States so not very many were made

http://healeyspecialists.com/low-mil...oupe-for-sale/


















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Last edited by c107; 28th April 2018 at 05:43 PM.
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  #69  
Old 25th February 2018, 03:13 AM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

The clarity of body lines and purity of design are well represented by this car with its attractive colour scheme. I wonder what the under bonnet section is like ? The initial pictures of the power plant drive fear into heart and soul. Very messy and worn out looking. Regards Styria
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  #70  
Old 25th February 2018, 03:42 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

A few more reviews:

Motor Sport magazine, October 1966:

https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/a...6/66/older-men

Rover P5 3 Liter Mk III Coupe

OLD age is a miseralsle business, as the late Somerset Maugham so graphically explained. Sight and hearing are impaired, the palate wearies, you tire quickly and are beset by ailments. You continue to look at women but they do not look at you. Approaching this unhappy state reactions slow and you tend to drive slowly along in the middle of the road, obstructing others—although I note that this is also a habit of many drivers but half my age. . . .

These thoughts were brought on when, going to Rover's London depot to collect for test a 2000TC, I was given instead a 3-litre Mk. III.

.....

Within, though, it is mighty comfortable and very fully equipped in a notably individualistic style. The leather-upholstered seats are particularly restful, the gears can be changed quite pleasantly by a central lever, reverse safeguarded by a press-button in the lever-knob. Bottom gear whines, the others are quiet. This 4-speed transmission is supplemented by overdrive controlled by a l.h. steering-column stalk, but this is not effective on a trailing throttle, nor is it possible to get overdrive to disengage at small throttle openings. This is mildly inconvenient and I prefer positive selection, if one must have o/d at all.

.....

In a country in which speed is officially discouraged I think there is quite a lot to be said for motoring in quiet and comfort. The 3-litre Rover is extremely comfortable, in its own characteristic style, while its degree of hush must be close to that of the World's most expensive luxury cars—yet it -costs only just over £2,000.

There is a saloon version for bulky people or people who crave a bulkier car, but the low-roofed coupe has adequate room in its rear compartment, With separate-type seatings, for two people, and another on the arm-rest, and there is an enormous boot with the spare wheel in a wind-down container under its floor.

It was when I came to go quickly in the 3-litre Rover that my enthusiasm diminished. I have never liked Hydrosteer power-assisted steering and while that on the car from Solihull was better than that of the only 4-litre R-type Vanden Plas I have driven, it was far from perfect. Visibility to the near-side was restricted, the servo-assisted Girling disc/drum brakes were spongy and not very reassuring, and the degree of roll on corners, even before the 6.70 X 15 Dunlop RS5s protested, was not to my liking. Maybe I really am senile, for several of my friends whom I regard as discerning drivers lover their 3-litre Rovers, or profess to. To me, however, this big Rover seems to be an inexpensive luxury car for the older motorist. . .
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  #71  
Old 25th February 2018, 03:56 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Rover P5 Classic Review:

https://www.tradeuniquecars.com.au/n...budget-tempter

These are big luxurious cars – big enough to carry four six-footers in comfort - much favoured by the former Queen Mother in the UK, who is said to have ordered two when she heard manufacture was about to cease.

The people who bought them tended to be professionals and middle managers – they were a step down from a Rolls-Royce but were nevertheless an indulgence.
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  #72  
Old 1st March 2018, 06:43 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Very original MK III Manual overdrive coupe with webasto sunroof

https://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C788155












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Last edited by c107; 28th April 2018 at 05:45 PM.
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  #73  
Old 2nd March 2018, 04:26 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Hi C107, congratulations on finding and featuring this Mark III Manual with Overdrive. Not only is it very, very rare but, believe it or not, it is exactly the same colour scheme as my Mark IIa that I am restoring, and that I bought back in about 1971. This car has the sliding sunroof exactly the same as mine, and it also sports the very rare optional rear deadrests (which I don't have). In addition, the front seats between Mark 3 and Mark 2a are decidedly different. Mark 2s have their own individual arm rests, and are differently shaped.

Here is one picture that is readily available within my system. It depicts the car in its original White, which was the colour when I bought it and before I decided to change the colour to Admiralty Blue and Slate Grey roof.


Regards Styria

N.B. My apologies - by the time this pic was taken, I already had the bottom half of the car re-sprayed in Jaguar Lavender Blue. By Golly. did I not love that colour. The number plate - DTZ 432 - is still in my possession, but has never been set aside. On the radiator grille, one can also see a Lagonda badge, as well as an Aston Martin badge. The little boy in front of the car is my oldest, Richard, who now works for a well known Computer Company, in his role of 2 iC for Australia and the general Pacific Region. He is off to China and Taiwan next week. I do have some more pics of that car, but will need to fetch them - and the bike ? It is my Montesa 250cc Cappra Motocrosser which I used to race - albeit somewhat unsuccessfully.

Last edited by Styria; 2nd March 2018 at 04:34 PM.
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  #74  
Old 2nd March 2018, 10:18 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

Quote:
Originally Posted by Styria View Post
Here is one picture that is readily available within my system. It depicts the car in its original White, which was the colour when I bought it and before I decided to change the colour to Admiralty Blue and Slate Grey roof. by the time this pic was taken, I already had the bottom half of the car re-sprayed in Jaguar Lavender Blue. By Golly. did I not love that colour. The number plate - DTZ 432 - is still in my possession, but has never been set aside.
I think you made the right choice changing from the white to the admiralty blue. The colour scheme of the MKIII is rather dignified and I don't think white suits the P5 - especially the coupe with the large painted areas compared to windows etc. Good to see the photo from way back when and that you still have the original number plate, now a piece of history associated with the car. Photo must be a fair while ago for your son to be so young.

BTW: I think the P5 3 liters look good with a set of period lucas driving lights, like the LHD one above (although I would go with the smaller ones). Looks better than the P5B with the attached lights,
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Last edited by c107; 2nd March 2018 at 10:23 PM.
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  #75  
Old 2nd March 2018, 10:44 PM
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Default Re: The Rover P5/P5B

I found a few more photos of the MKIII



















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