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EXTERIORS & BODY REPAIRS Bring your beloved back to its former glory - or just polish the chrome some more!

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Old 23rd February 2008, 12:43 PM
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Default What do you use for rust proofing?

What do other people use for rustproofing other than never driving in the rain and deodorized fish oil.

My wife always ask me why my car smells on a hot day.

Bill
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Old 23rd February 2008, 06:59 PM
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Im certainly interested in what people will have to say on this one Bill, I think theres a number of products you can use, depending on where you want it to go, I think for places like the inside of the sill you want a product that is fairly 'runny' so that it can get into all those little cavities, styria is making noises about getting some por15, we have used cavity wax before but I think its more of a prevention product rather than a converter.......good topic Bill...regards parks
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Old 23rd February 2008, 07:23 PM
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I am working through my 6.9 panel by panel. Everytime I open a door or remove trim I insert a low pressure spray gun with a plastic tube on the end and have different diameters and lengths up to 3 metres.

I have been converting any internal rust I can find (fortunately not a lot) and then using deoderized fish-oil which goes on as a fine mist and then sets after initially running everywhere.

But it does smell a bit oily on some of our hot 40 degree plus days - particularly from, the front door cavities with the air-con on full blast.

Bill
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Old 23rd February 2008, 07:39 PM
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well I think your on the right track Bill, we are doing similiar things
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Old 24th February 2008, 06:48 AM
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Hi Bill, it is surprising how many people will scoff their nose at Fish Oil, basically condemning it as old hat technology. In another section, I have made reference to rust in some areas of my 6.9, and I can tell you that Fish Oil applied at various times (say three times in twelve years) has NOT stopped rust from becoming evident under the paint that was applied some seven years ago-the present colour scheme being 877 Petrol. However, having said that, I wonder if there would be more rust if I hadn't used Fish Oil.

Rust is particularly noted in the left front door along the front vertical section of the door skin, whilst the driver's door is afflicted right at the bottom in the channel where the bottom part of the door rubber is located. There is also a patch just under the aluminium door mould above the door handle-plus a couple of other, fairly minor areas. Now, as far as the bottom channel is concerned-you know where the rubber sits-more often than not, people will tell you that the drain holes are blocked. Well, on my car, anyway, that theory can be discounted. Quite frankly, I feel that the rubber itself, by design and its method of fitting, is responsible for retaining moisture and/or water which takes too long to get away.

I have just bought some POR15 as it appears to now be the ultimate-naturally, only time will tell but, certainly, I'll go with the flow right now. We have also used a product put out by a Company called Phoenix and paradoxically, they are located in WA. It has two types of product-for new metal and old. Again, how do we know how well it works ? The simple answer is that we don't know. Others, like Ozbenzhead (on another forum) have made up their own mixture, yet I seem to recall that just recently he was going to use POR 15. Over to others with opinions. Regards, Styria
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Old 24th February 2008, 07:23 AM
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Guys,

I have never heard any negative comments on POR15. I have used it in the distant and the not-too-distant past (my 690SEL) and so far never had any come backs or dramas.

Fish oil (non-smelly or not) stinks.... literally and I could not handle the smell as Prestons (in the West also) does have it's share of 40C+ days.
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Old 3rd March 2008, 06:38 AM
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I have to go with fish oil but I've never used anything else so I can't compare. I've done the doors on several cars and they didn't rust unlike their contemporaries.

I does stink, even the supposedly de-odourised stuff but with door trims off and left in the sun it's gone in a few months.

koan
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Old 3rd March 2008, 10:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Styria View Post
[...] Others, like Ozbenzhead (on another forum) have made up their own mixture, yet I seem to recall that just recently he was going to use POR 15. [...] Styria
Yup - until recently I've always used the following recipe:

1 part fish oil (the full-bodied stinky stuff)
1 part Diesel oil (helps the mixture creep up into places you'd never find)
1 part thinners (to make it sprayable).

Must say it appears to have seriously slowed the establishment of new rust, but it certainly doesn't stop the growth of existing rust by a noticeable amount - even though I always pre-treated any rust with acidic converters (of which I found the best to be those based on tannic acid rather than the more common phosphoric acid products). I used to do an entire car approx. every three years. With so many cars now, I'm looking to a longer-term solution.

My next project is with POR15.
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Old 6th March 2008, 05:26 AM
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Hi Ozbenzhead, I am just a bit lost - what is the difference betweem tannic and phosphoric acid ? What I use from time to time is a product called Deoxidine which can be partly diluted with water. I can be sprayed or brushed on parts with surface rust and certainly seems to convert it into some sort of milky substance and appears to assume a 'coating' that will last for quite a long time, especially if stored in dry conditions.

I think it is more of a panel beater's 'cleaning the metal surface' product rather than a rust preventer, but I am not sure. Have you had any experience in that regard ? Would be interested in your comment. Regards, Styria
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Old 6th March 2008, 07:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Styria View Post
Hi Ozbenzhead, I am just a bit lost - what is the difference betweem tannic and phosphoric acid ? [...]
The phosphoric-based rust converters that I've used always left a white powdery residue that had to be removed (with a damp cloth) before any other coatings could be applied.

Rust would inevitably return in the same place a couple of years later, leading me to suspect that the penetration of the converter wasn't very deep.

OTOH, the tannic-based product I've used - Exit Rust by Liquid Engineering (a WA-based mob, I think) - leaves a smooth, somewhat glossy finish with no powdery residue, and can be painted over without further preparation.

I've yet to see any rust treated with that stuff come back - and I started using it about six years ago.

It is available from only some retail outlets - in my town, a small independent one - not the biggies such as Repco or Super Cheap (or wasn't when I bought it).
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Old 7th April 2008, 08:12 AM
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Default Re: What do you use for rust proofing?

Well, I have finally had the opportunity to use the much vaunted POR 15 to rustproof David's 6.9. Obviously, I am in no position to laud its praises regarding the product's effectiveness as a rust preventative as only time will be able to reveal that, but I can certainly talk about how to use it, as some members that came to our get together and the Show and Shine day will testify.

First things first. There was probably as much of the stuff on my hands and face as in and on the car itself... and brother, let me assure you, once it's on your skin, you won't remove it in a hurry. No amount of solvents or thinners will touch it - you can also forget soap, detergents and scrubbing brushes - it will be there for days and not budge. So, the first precautionary measure to implement when using the product is to use very good quality, thin rubber gloves such as used in hospitals - not the everyday throw away variety that you buy at the supermarkets. Naturally, I was glove-free, wasn't I, happily ignoring instructions contained in the pamphlet that comes with the product.

Secondly, POR 15 itself is quite fluidity, and can be applied with a primer gun, especially if it is mixed with no more than 15% special solvent to thin it down - but, 15% max., no more. However, one would only use a spray gun if POR 15 was to be used as a top coat. My understanding is that one can even apply automotive paint over it after it has dried thoroughly - a period of some three to five hours depending on ambient temperature.

With David's car, I used an engine degreasing gun after removing all door trims, plastic entry steps and removal of the rubber bungs that allow access to the sill panels . I also removed said rubber bungs from the inside of the rear guards which are double skinned and suspect to rust starting internally. With the rear of the car up in the air and wheels removed, I also gained access to the rear chassis members.

Extreme care must be taken when using an engine degreasing gun because of the continuous drip from the nozzle - get that stuff on any cloth material, such as carpets etc. and you have to be QUICK to remove it - once it would set, forget it. I would also suggest that any drain holes in door panels. sills etc. be taped up prior to applying the stuff because if you don't, a lot of it will simply finish up on the floor or ground. Hope this helps with any 'budding' user of POR 15. Regards, Styria
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Old 7th April 2008, 09:05 AM
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Default Re: What do you use for rust proofing?

Thanks Styria, I am in the process of getting one of the 116's rust proofed, the other one I want to investigate further is an ERPS (electronic rust prevention system) I have seen both excellent and no so excellent results.
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Old 7th April 2008, 12:21 PM
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Default Re: What do you use for rust proofing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 116Benz View Post
[...] the other one I want to investigate further is an ERPS (electronic rust prevention system) I have seen both excellent and no so excellent results.
The first type of those to be made available to cars was not suited to the job: it was designed for permanently wet situations such as boats. Useless on a car unless it lived in the water.

The later type were designed for (mostly) dry use, and are more suited to cars.

Also, a word of caution: if the polarity is incorrect (i.e. reversed from that which is recommended in the unit's installation instructions) rusting will be exacerbated!
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Old 7th April 2008, 02:37 PM
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Default Re: What do you use for rust proofing?

Quote:
Originally Posted by OzBenzHead View Post
The first type of those to be made available to cars was not suited to the job: it was designed for permanently wet situations such as boats. Useless on a car unless it lived in the water.

The later type were designed for (mostly) dry use, and are more suited to cars.

Also, a word of caution: if the polarity is incorrect (i.e. reversed from that which is recommended in the unit's installation instructions) rusting will be exacerbated!
Thats where this forum comes in so handy! I wouldnt have known to ask that question. In saying that, I used to flog the stuff to unsuspecting punters, my only excuse was that it paid for a 300TE.
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