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MECHANICALS With a 30 year-old automobile, there will always be discussion here - maintenance, modifications and mechanicals.

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  #1  
Old 4th November 2008, 07:58 PM
BAR
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Default Oil Changing

I tried to find a 14mm Allen key recently at many auto shops and Bunnings without success: in a vain attempt to do an oil change over the weekend.

I sent off an email and got a reply from the Hazet distributors Info [info@europeantools.com.au]:

The wrench with the 14 and 17 mm inhex socket is a Hazet part # 2760. We got this tool in stock. The price is $ 97.45 excl. GST. You could buy it directly from us (with Mastercard or Visa), in this case a delivery charge of $ 8.00 excl. GST would also apply.

Or you can get in touch with one of our mobile van resellers. The closest to you would be - Tooling Around, Steve Mob 0418 236 488.

Now I am pretty sure that a 14mm Allen Key / Socket drive would be a more economical and practical solution.... where to get one?
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  #2  
Old 4th November 2008, 08:06 PM
BenzBoy BenzBoy is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Trythe Metrinch range. That is where I got mine.
Regards,
BenzBoy
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  #3  
Old 4th November 2008, 08:21 PM
B13 B13 is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

I just bought one from TTI, Total Tool industries 1/2" socket drive 14mm hex driver whatever its called, it was under $20 and only a couple of suburbs drive away.

http://www.totaltools.com.au/icat/pdf.php?id=166

You want individual socket part number INH14M.

Don't pay stupid european prices.
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  #4  
Old 4th November 2008, 10:16 PM
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TJ 450 TJ 450 is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

I use a Sidchrome set of 1/2" drive inhex sockets and they are of excellent quality, minimal chance of rounding out those bolts. I got the set from Coventry's and it includes 6mm up to 17mm so it is even good for 6.9 chain tensioners as well. They are also available individually from the same place and anywhere else that stocks Sidchrome tools.

Tim
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  #5  
Old 5th November 2008, 03:29 AM
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Styria Styria is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Hi Bar, if you'd go to Parklea Markets that are only ten minutes drive from your home, you can purchase a complete set of half inch drive similar to what Tim has bought for about $55.00 - sure, Chinese made, but nevertheless quite good quality.

There'll be at least two, if not three, stores run by Indians that would accomodate you. Regards Styria
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Old 5th November 2008, 06:09 AM
GreaseMonkey
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Styria View Post
Hi Bar, if you'd go to Parklea Markets that are only ten minutes drive from your home, you can purchase a complete set of half inch drive similar to what Tim has bought for about $55.00 - sure, Chinese made, but nevertheless quite good quality.

There'll be at least two, if not three, stores run by Indians that would accomodate you. Regards Styria
At a pinch maybe, but that hardly sounds like a "quality" tool operation does it Styria. I suggest you go the Sidchrome route, give the Chinese tools a miss. I got a socket drive cheap enough, there are enough around but you get what you pay for.
CHris M.
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Old 5th November 2008, 04:30 PM
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Styria Styria is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Hi Grease Monkey, I'd probably disagree with you a bit - for a start, don't forget that, after all, Sidchrome Tools are made in China too these days.

Furthermore, Bar is going to use that size socket once a year at the outside - I am quietly confident that it would last him a lifetime - at his age, and the number of times he'd change the oil. In fact, I am prepared to guarantee he will only do it the once - it's a messy job,you've got to dispose of the oil, and the time it would take him to get everything organized, he'd make eight times the savings he would achieve by doing the job himself.

After all, high power is his game,, and it does not refer to undoing nuts and bolts. Okay Bar, over to you ! Chinese it has to be. Regards Styria
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Old 5th November 2008, 08:58 PM
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SELfor50 SELfor50 is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

I agree Styria, depending on the amount of use - generally you don't have to spend the top $$$ just cause the cost says it's better. There are socket drives that are better than others, but if you're not using them every day OR you don't need to negotiate a nut/bolt in a very tight squeeze, then why spend the $$'s if you don't need to?!

Alternatively, a big ass flat head screwdriver (appropriately fitted) will do the job just fine for the hex bolt in the sump yeah??!
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Old 5th November 2008, 09:15 PM
GreaseMonkey
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Sure, China can produce better steel, when they want to, but really, Indians at Parklea markets are not going to apply the same quality controls as Sidchrome.
I have seen Chinese metal (??) tools that have the strength of soggy cardboard, but hey, your choice.........go buy one of those four socket cross type wheelbraces for $9.99 at Repco and try to jump on it to undo a tight wheel nut, yeah you really appreciate Chinese quality when you get back up off the road and pick up the pieces.

Chris M.
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  #10  
Old 5th November 2008, 10:27 PM
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Default Re: Oil Changing

You should be able to determine the quality of the tool just be looking at it. If it's going to break, it will look as if it will break.
Regardless of quality, the majority of tools either come from China, Taiwan or India. I would definitely check out what these guys at Parklea Markets have got.
I would bring a socket head bolt along and check out the tolerances though, some can be way off.

Tim
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  #11  
Old 6th November 2008, 02:33 AM
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Talking of oil changes, I've just paid R$104 for 8 litres of Texaco Ursa TDX and thats because I buy from the supplier
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Old 6th November 2008, 10:56 AM
BAR
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Well, thanks for all the well meaning comments.

Generally I agree with most of them, except using a bloody big screwdriver - that tool would not undo a sump plug unless it was about to fall out.

It generally gets down to time and distance.

Total Tools have a good range of products made for them and I have a set of their ratchet ring/open spanners which are just great value for money. They are scattered around the Sydney suburbs, the closest to me being 1/2 hour away. They have a Koken [Japanese Tool] and their own brand of 14mm 1/2 in socket Hex socket.

Now by chance I dropped into a Hardware store in the CDB as I was walking by and they had the Koken product for <$20: a dollar more than at Total Tools, but as I was there it ends up being cheaper [no 1 hour drive].

If I was a rich man, I'd go out and buy a full complement of Hazet tools and special tools just for the W116, but then that'd cost more than any W116 is worth! But what the heck, they are lovely tools that would last many generations of daily use.
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Old 6th November 2008, 04:34 PM
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SELfor50 SELfor50 is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

The big screw driver get's wedged between the plug and the sump.. then hit the end with a hammer!! After enough hitting the plug pops out..

Same result is produced when you use a crowbar!
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  #14  
Old 6th November 2008, 04:47 PM
BenzBoy BenzBoy is offline
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Quote:
Originally Posted by SELfor50 View Post
The big screw driver get's wedged between the plug and the sump.. then hit the end with a hammer!! After enough hitting the plug pops out..

Same result is produced when you use a crowbar!
Excellent advice. Now we have the oil out.
How do we keep the new oil in the sump? Reverse procedure?
I'm just about the change the oil on the PII and as I don't have a Whitworth spanner I'll follow your suggestions and let you know what happens. I mean, the worst I can do is crack the sump casting isn't it?
Regards,
BenzBoy
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  #15  
Old 6th November 2008, 06:45 PM
GreaseMonkey
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Default Re: Oil Changing

Anyone remeber those drive-in oil change places that used to suck (mmmmm, thanks Mrs) the old oil up through the dipstick tube (here we go again perverts), no really, and replace with fresh oil without needing to remove the plug. I seem to remember a new filter was an option!
Chris M.
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